Portrait of Miss Elizabeth Oakes, 1928, 60" x 36", O/C
Portrait of Miss Elizabeth Oakes, 1928, 60″ x 36″, O/C


Charles Allan Winter, American, (1869-1942)

            Charles Allan Winter was an illustrator, landscape and marine painter who used bright colors andimpressionist style. He painted at Gloucester, Massachusetts and St. Louis,Missouri and exhibited at the Paris Salon and the Art Institute of Chicago. His illustrations were published in magazines such as Collier’s, Cosmopolitan,Hearst Magazines and The Masses; creating several covers for the magazines. Hiswork was often featured in Hubbard’s “The Fra Magazine”; his styleand aesthetic was recognized by proponents of that influential and lastingmovement. A number of his allegorical murals on the history of Gloucester aredisplayed at City Hall and Gloucester High School. Winter was much influencedby the Fauvist movement and was particularly taken with the works of Van Gogh,and also the work of Raphael, and the Christian Masters, as a result of his studies in Rome.

            Winter gave lectures about his color theories, influencing The Eight, including John Sloan. It was at the suggestionof Charles Allan Winter that John Sloan first ventured to Gloucester, MA topaint during the summer of 1914. During the years 1914-1918, Charles AllanWinter, his wife Alice Beach Winter and Agnes Richmond, were the summer guestsof John Sloan. Named the “Red Cottage Artists”, these artists livedand painted together sharing a common color theory. This special period endedin 1919, when John Sloan departed with Randall Davey for Santa Fe.

            The Winters remained in Gloucester for many years teaching and working with other artists who came to the area. He died on September 23, 1942 at the age of seventy-two and is buried in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

            Portrait of Miss Elizabeth Oakes, 1928 by Charles Allen Winter, 60” x 36, O/C

The painting, Portrait of Miss Elizabeth Oaks, is framed with a Thulin frame #2078, 1929, incised with monogram on the back, “WT”. The painting was shown at the Gloucester Society of Artists in the First Exhibition of their sixth season, held June and July of 1928. The exhibition was held at “Galleries – Eastern Point Road, East Gloucester. It was also exhibited at the North Shore Arts Association in August – Sept, 2014. An image is included in several of Judith Curtis’s books and articles including Artists and the Cape Ann Experience, American Art Review, Artists and the Cape Ann Experience 1895 – 2005 North Shore Arts Association Exhibition Catalog, and, Rocky Neck Art Colony 1850 – 1950. A photo copy of an article from the Boston Herald 1924 or 1925 is of a woman identified as Elizabeth Oaks

            Elizabeth Oakes and her sisters were frequent visitors to the home of Charles Allen Winter at the Red Cottage in East Gloucester. She and her sisters were the children of a wealthy dye manufacturer who may have had a summer home at 9 St. Louis Ave at Eastern Point, Gloucester.

The fleur-de-lis pattern in the background of the painting may be a reference to the crusader French King St. Louis whose soldiers bore the insignia on their shields. It may have been part of a secret code.  The dress worn by Elizabeth Oakes bears a similarity to a dress in the collection of the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, DC. , worn by Grace Coolidge, the wife of President Calvin Coolidge.

Charles Allen Winter demonstrated a mastery of the ability to convincingly paint different fabric textiles such as silk (stockings), velvet and metallic gold cloth (pillows). Miss Oakes is wearing shoes that show a neo-Egyptian pelican motif; the ancient pelican motif influenced by the ongoing archeological excavations of Tutankhamen’s tomb in Egypt. 

 Extensive provenance is included with thepurchase of the painting.

Portrait of Miss Elizabeth Oakes, 1928, 60" x 36", O/C
Portrait of Miss Elizabeth Oakes, 1928, 60″ x 36″, O/C
Portrait of Miss Elizabeth Oakes, 1928, 60" x 36", O/C
Portrait of Miss Elizabeth Oakes, 1928, 60″ x 36″ Unframed

Portrait of Miss Elizabeth Oakes, 1928, 60″ x 36″, O/C